480 Squadron Activities

Here you can find more information on the activites that 480 Squadron participates in.

 

  • Flying
  • Gliding
  • Shooting
  • Adventure Training
  • Fieldcraft
  • Basic Survival
  • DofE Award
  • Sports

Flying

All the cadets have ht opportunity to go on regular Air Experience Flights (AEF) which are designed to show the cadets the basics of flying. Each flight typically lasts for 30 minutes, in which the cadets have the opportunity to take control of the aircraft for a short period in each flight so that they can put into practice what the pilot has shown them. After their 3rd or 4th flight, cadets can request the opportunity to experience aerobatics. The current aircraft used for all Air Experience Flights is the Grob Tutor.

Grob Tutor T1

Grob Tutor T1

 

Gliding

As well as going on AEF's, cadets can also undertake elementary flying training at a Volunteer Gliding School (VGS). Most VGSs at RAF stations will use the Grob Vigilant T1 for the gliding. Although the Vigilant is a powered aircraft, the pilot is able to turn the engine off during flight and the aircraft will still glide like a non-powered glider. However, it is more common for pilots to put the enging on idle for the duration of the flight. Some VGSs that are not situated at an RAF station use the Grob Viking T1 for gliding. The Viking is a non-powered glider that is commonly launched by winch. Gliding initially consists of three Gliding Induction Courses (GIC), GIC 1, GIC 2 and GIC 3. Each course focuses on one of the 3 axes of flight, pitch, roll and yaw.

Grob Vigilant T1

Grob Vigilant T1

Grob Vigilant T1

Grob Viking T1

Grob Viking T1

Grob Viking T1

 

Marksmanship/Shooting

All cadets have the opportunity to participate in rifle shooting. As part of their First Class training, cadets are trained in how to fire the No.8 .22 Rifle. After the training, they will be required to take a Weapon Handling Test (WHT) for the No.8 Rifle, which will enable the cadets to fire the weapon on a live range in a safe manner. When cadets reach the age of 15yrs 6mths, they have the opportunity to go on a weekend course to undertake training on the L98A1. This is a more powerful rifle than the No.8 Rifle. To undertake the training, cadets are required to have previously passed and have a current WHT on the No.8 Rifle as well as meeting the age requirement. Once the training is complete and the cadets have passed the WHT for the L98A1, they will then be allowed to fire the weapon on a live range. Currently, the ATC is in the process of replacing the L98A1 with a new, upgraded version, the L98A2. They are both very similar weapons, however, the major difference will be that the L98A2 will be a semi-automatic rifle as opposed to the L98A1 being a single shot rifle. The L98A2 has now been issued to Warwickshire and Birmingham Wing and the first conversion courses for the cadets have already been run, with more to follow in the very near future.

No.8 .22 Rifle

No.8 .22 Rifle

L98A1 Rifle

L98A1 Rifle

Cadets firing the L98A1 on a Gallery Range

Cadets firing the L98A1 on a Gallery Range

 

Adventure Training

All cadets have the opportunity to take part in adventure training activities, ranging from expeditions and camping to initiative exercises. Adventure training consits of activities that don't fall under the Fieldcraft catagory. Not only can the cadets take part in adventure training activities with their squadron at places such as Elan Valley, they also have the opportunity to go on adventure training activities with their respective Wing. These activities ran by Wing include Skiing, Parachuting and Off-shore Sailing. Cadets may also get the chance to go to one of the ATC's adventure training centres for climbing, canoeing or camping.

Wing Greens Camp Adventure Training Activities - Easter 2008

Wing Greens Camp Adventure Training Activities - Easter 2008

 

Fieldcraft

Every year, cadets can attend various fieldcraft training 'courses' organised by the Wing or between squadrons to teach new cadets the skills of fieldcraft and to enhance those skills further with more experienced cadets.

Fieldcraft is a set of skills required to operate stealthily at day or night regardless of weather or terrain. The motto of fieldcraft is "to see without being seen"; this is upheld through the skills learned in field craft lessons.

These skills include camouflage, understanding the difference between concealment from view and cover from fire, use of the shape of the ground and its features to move undetected, the skills of moving across ground and crossing obstacles, the ability to select good fire positions, lying up positions, camping positions and the like, the ability to observe effectively, penetrating camouflage, and the ability to detect where enemy fire is coming from using a number of techniques.

 

Basic Aircrew Survival Course

Every year we run a Basic Aircrew Survival Course where cadets spend 3 days and 2 nights out in Sennybridge Training Area putting into practice the skills they have learnt on surviving in the field on minimum rations as well as completing tasks to aid their survival.

The skills that the cadets learn before hand and put into practice on the course include setting up a harbour area for them to 'live' in, building and maintaining a fire and cooking & eating in the field.

The cadets are awarded a certificate after the course to show that have participated in and completed the Basic Aircrew Survival course.

Basic Survival Course Team - April 2009

Basic Survival Course Team - April 2009

 

Duke of Edinburgh Award

The Duke of Edinburgh's Award is a voluntary non-competitive programme of practical, cultural and adventurous activities. It is designed to support the personal and social development of young people aged 14-25 years. It offers an individual challenge and encourages young people to undertake exciting constructive, challenging and enjoyable activities in their free time.

Cadets can gain their Bronze and Silver Duke of Endinburgh's Awards through their squadron by meeting to criteria detailed on the Duke of Edinburgh's Award website. However, for cadets to achieve their Gold Duke of Edinburgh's Award, they need to complete various areas of the criteria listing with their Wing, such as the expedition.

For detailed information on the criteria for the Duke of Edinburgh's Award and various other information about the award, please visit their website here.

Duke of Edinburgh's Award Logo

Gold DofE Practice Expedition Team - April 2009

Gold DofE Practice Expedition Team - April 2009

 

Sports

We encourage all cadets to take part in all the sporting activities available in the ATC. It does not matter whether you are the sportiest person around or not, as we encourage all to take part and do their best.

Throughout the Air Training Corps, there are 7 key sports that cadets are free to take part in:

  • Rugby
  • Football
  • Netball
  • Hockey
  • Swimming
  • Athletics
  • Cross-Country Running

 

Cadets compete against each other in these sports between the squadrons in each Wing. If any cadets perform particularly well in any of these sports, then they may be chosen to represent their Wing at Region Level and gain a Wing 'Blue'. Cadets who still stand out at this level, may also get chosen to represent their Region at Corps Level and gain a Regional 'Blue'.